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Davis makes major concession to Brexit rebels by pledging any final deal WILL be enshrined in separate Act of Parliament as ministers gear up for pitch battle over EU Withdrawal Bill

2019
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David Davis made a major concession to Brexit rebels today as he declared any final deal will be enshrined in a separate Act of Parliament.

The Brexit Secretary acted to head off an impending clash with Tory Remainers as he updated MPs on progress with negotiations.

It fulfils one of the key demands made by Conservative politicians calling for a ‘softer’ departure from the EU.

But ministers are still facing a titanic battle to push the EU Withdrawal Bill through parliament.

Former ministers Dominic Grieve, Nicky Morgan and Anna Soubry are among those threatening to side with Labour in votes on the legislation, which is coming back to the House of Commons this week.

More than 400 amendments have been tabled, with the first major clashes due to be over whether to include a fixed Brexit date on the front page of the law.

Delivering a statement to MPs, Brexit Secretary acted to head off an impending clash with Tory Remainers by committing to separate legislation on any deal with the EU

Delivering a statement to MPs, Brexit Secretary acted to head off an impending clash with Tory Remainers by committing to separate legislation on any deal with the EU

The Prime Minister (pictured in Downing Street today) is braced for a struggle over the EU Withdrawl Bill

The Prime Minister (pictured in Downing Street today) is braced for a struggle over the EU Withdrawl Bill, which is being stewarded through parliament by Brexit Secretary David Davis (pictured right today)

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer (pictured in the Commons today) is insisting that there must not be a 'red line' against keeping the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice during a transition period

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer (pictured in the Commons today) is insisting that there must not be a ‘red line’ against keeping the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice during a transition period