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Sir Bill Cash puts Soubry in her place during heated Brexit clash in the Commons

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LONGSTANDING eurosceptic Sir Bill Cash put fellow Conservative MP Anna Soubry in her place during a heated Brexit debate in the House of Commons. MPs were discussing the potential of Britain remaining attached to the European Union by

remaining members of the European Economic Area. The EEA joins all 28 EU members, including the UK, with three non-EU states – Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. Sir Bill, MP for Stone, argued free trade agreements would not be possible

after Brexit Britain would have to leave the EEA, customs union and the European Free Trade Association. He said: “It removes the freedom we would need for negotiations with third countries. “This includes any period in the EEA being party to

the EEA agreement like EFTA states or a bilateral Swiss-style agreement. “The EEA essentially means membership of the single market and commitment to the four freedoms – free movement of goods, services, capital and workers.” Sir Bill added

Britain would fail to be a “credible” partner in future trade negotiations if the country remained attached to the EU in such a way. The Stone MP proceeded to give way to Ms Soubry, who read some of Sir Bill’s past comments on the EEA. She said: “Could I

put this to my Honourable Friend these words? “The great advantage of the EFTA model is that it is completely independent of the EU, yet follows the decisions of the European Court of Justice, on the most part, though not always. “That is important,

I’m glad my Right Honourable Friend for Loughborough noticed that because not many people have. “I just wondered because those are the very words of my Honourable Friend, which he said as recorded in Hansard in July.” Sir Bill fired back, declaring the “argument had moved on”. “The reality is that the mandate of the British people is clear,” he said. “We have already passed the Article 50 act by 499 in this house to 110, or there and there about, and, furthermore, the decision that was taken on the Repeal Bill itself was passed by a majority. “And, therefore we do repeal the European Communities Act of 1972, this is the will of this house and that is what I stand on. “The reality is these proposals to put us into the EEA would effectively be contrary to the mandate of the British people.”